Archive for the ‘Guest Bloggers’ Category

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Multimodal Mondays: Re/Mixing Multimodal Assignments Across Courses and Disciplines

posted: 2.9.15 by Andrea Lunsford

Today’s guest blogger is Jeanne Law Bohannon.

When I begin a new semester, I try to make time to reflect on my pedagogy and its implications/opportunities for student-scholars across my courses and across disciplines.  This semester, I have actually done it! You may recall that last fall I blogged on a Multimodal Monday about Gaming Vlogcasting. I wanted to take that assignment and re/mix it for a different audience and purpose.  [read more]

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Categories: Assignment Idea, Digital Writing, Guest Bloggers, Literature, Multimodal Mondays, Teaching with Technology, Visual Rhetoric
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Multimodal Mondays: Composing within the Blogosphere

posted: 1.26.15 by Andrea Lunsford

Today’s guest blogger is Kim Haimes-Korn.

When I first started using blogging in my classes it was in an advanced writing class as a specialized genre, presented as an extension of the classical essay form. This was easy to demonstrate to students because of the particular characteristics:  the desire to discover, the conversational tone, the writerly movement between the specific and the universal, the strong sense of audience engagement.   I also have students create electronic portfolios in many of my classes. The portfolios provided a place for students – as working writers – to revise their writings and showcase their work in public arenas. [read more]

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Categories: Assignment Idea, Guest Bloggers, Multimodal Mondays, Revising, Teaching with Technology, Writing Process
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Multimodal Mondays: Wrapping it Up – From Digital Badges to E-dentities

posted: 12.8.14 by Andrea Lunsford

Today’s guest blogger is Jeanne Law Bohannon.

 I began my posts for this semester’s blog with a piece about e-badges, and how students develop their e-dentities through the production of personal e-badges.  As my students and I wrap up our semester, we are thinking about what it means to create and nurture our e-dentities.  We have developed and grown our e-dentities for the past few months on public domains, through an initiative led by the University of Mary Washington, Emory University, and this semester, at my school, Southern Polytechnic State University. [read more]

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Categories: Activity Idea, Andrea Lunsford, Guest Bloggers, Multimodal Mondays, Teaching with Technology
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What Do GTAs Learn?

posted: 12.3.14 by Barclay Barrios

Our last guest blogger for this round is Rachel Hartnett.  Rachel is a first-year MA student at Florida Atlantic University, where she is studying science fiction and fantasy literature. She is also a journalist with MuggleNet.com, the number one Harry Potter fan site in the world. She lives in Lake Worth with her cat, Snidely.

 What I like about Rachel’s post is her reflection on what she has learned about herself as a teacher and as a student.  I think about the role of Graduate Teaching Assistants quite a bit (because we use so many of them in our program).  They often seem to occupy a deeply liminal space in the institution—neither a teacher nor a student but both.  I frequently observe some of the negative consequences of this liminality in terms of things like pay and benefits.  What Rachel reminds me, though, is that the in-betweeness of GTAs also opens a space for learning and growth. [read more]

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Categories: Barclay Barrios, Guest Bloggers
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Multimodal Mondays: Composing Visually-Making Meaning through Text and Image

posted: 12.1.14 by Andrea Lunsford

Today’s guest blogger is Professor Kim Haimes-Korn.

We are all well aware that visual rhetoric has the power to communicate meaning on its own or in concert with text.  We interact with so many images every day that influence us, shape our perspectives and move our emotions. As teachers, we are usually comfortable engaging students in visual analysis where they participate in acts of interpretation. Multimodal composition offers students ways to extend those efforts and compose through visuals as well.

Generally, when students start composing visually they think primarily about the aesthetic appeal.  Although this is an important layer of visual impact, I encourage them to go beyond aesthetics and think about the ways composing with images is another rhetorical act in which we make choices about our purposes, audiences, subjects and contexts.  Our lessons about issues such as style. persuasion, voice, are still front and center in our writing instruction. [read more]

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Categories: Andrea Lunsford, Guest Bloggers, Multimodal Mondays, Visual Argument, Visual Rhetoric
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Trauma in the Classroom

posted: 11.24.14 by Susan Naomi Bernstein

Guest blogger Abby Nance has an MFA in Creative Writing from Texas State University and is an instructor at Gardner-Webb University. This is her seventh year teaching in the first year writing program. Her research explores the relationship between trauma and writing in the college classroom.

Last year at the Conference on College Composition and Communication, I spoke about the role of trauma in the writing lives of first-year college students. Whenever I talk about trauma, toxic stress, or mental health with other writing instructors, I feel deeply aware of my own students and the stories of abuse, neglect, violence, and anxiety that they hint at or explore outright in their own writing. If statistics can provide a baseline or a map, then many of our students are entering our classrooms with histories of trauma. [read more]

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Categories: Basic Writing, Guest Bloggers, Student Success, Teaching Advice
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Millennial Attention Spans

posted: 11.19.14 by Barclay Barrios

Nick Marino, our gest blogger for this week, is a first year student in the MA program at Florida Atlantic University, specializing in 20th century British Literature. He lives with his cat in South Florida, a place he finds oddly inspiring.

I’m with Nick on this meditation about the use of personal technology in the classroom, even through Richard Restak’s “Attention Deficit: The Brain Syndrome of Our Era” argues rather persuasively that multitasking is a myth.  In the classes I teach, I encourage “responsible” use of technology like smart phones: pull it out to bring up a reading, research the author on the internet, check your calendar, or even log in to Blackboard.  Need to answer that text or call?  No problem.  Discretely step outside.  I’m always a bit amazed that students find even this rather liberal policy challenging, texting in class anyway.  Maybe Nick’s thoughts can offer me some new directions.

What do you think? [read more]

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Categories: Guest Bloggers, Uncategorized
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Multimodal Mondays: Day in the Life: A DIY Assignment Using Immediate Media, Archives, and Animation to Engage Student-Scholars in Digital, Public Writing

posted: 11.3.14 by Andrea Lunsford

Students encounter public writing every day of their lives. While they are often critical consumers of such multimodal rhetorics, they more often need their teachers to guide them towards critical production of everyday public rhetorics. They need us to help them to decide invention—what it is they want to say; to discern arrangement and style—how are they going to say it; and to revise—prepare it for an audience who, like them, consumes more digital than printed texts.

If your students are like mine, they have a general distaste for “Dear Teacher” essays, preferring instead to produce critical compositions that carry meaning for them and their peers in popular culture. At SPSU, I have further found that students like to create performative texts on cultural topics of their choosing. While I understand, and usually agree, that self-choice of writing topics develops student stakeholders, in a first-year, first-semester composition course, students often need some structure while exploring cultural identities. The assignment I am writing about this week provides a DIY-packaged compromise that gives students opportunities to curate media from a specific cultural experience while maintaining the consistency that is sometimes necessary for first-year writing instruction. For this assignment, students will tweet, archive their tweets, then produce a 30-second expository animation that describes a “day in the life” of an identity they embody. [read more]

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Categories: Activity Idea, Assignment Idea, Guest Bloggers, Multimodal Mondays, Uncategorized
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Those Who Can

posted: 10.29.14 by Barclay Barrios

My guest blogger today, Jenn Murray, has spent the last 16 years as a Midwesterner trying to adjust to life in South Florida. After many years at home with her children, Jenn is currently in her first year of the MA program at Florida Atlantic University, where she is studying multicultural literature and trying to narrow her research interests enough for a thesis.

Jenn’s post isn’t only about the stages we all go through in emerging as teachers.  It’s also about the ways in which teaching makes us better writers.  I have to admit—I never thought about this before.  But in taking a moment to reflect I realize she’s absolutely right.  When I am writing an article I have a much sharper sense of my argument and what it needs to do, a clearer sense of my organization and the moves I want to make, and a surer understanding of what evidence I want to bring to bear.  A lot of that comes from experience in the discipline but now I can see how parts of it come from teaching writing.  Cool.

I know you’ve heard the saying.  We’ve all heard it at one point or another.  “Those who can, do. Those who can’t, teach.”  It’s one of those snarky comments that get tossed around without much thought, but I am doing a lot of thinking about it right now. [read more]

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Categories: Barclay Barrios, Guest Bloggers
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Multimodal Mondays: Lifehacking—Trying on New Rhetorical Strategies in Student Blogs

posted: 10.27.14 by Andrea Lunsford

I have my students use blogs to shape their digital identities and provide a space for them to share their work and ideas with others. I encourage them to go out into the world and critically examine their place within it through weekly exploratory blog posts. Many of these assignments are open ended and based on their observations and perceptions. However, I like to switch it up every once in a while and ask them to use a particular style or format as a rhetorical device to shape and deliver their ideas. [read more]

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Categories: Guest Bloggers
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