Archive for the ‘Guest Bloggers’ Category

Horizontal divider

Being Transformers

posted: 4.23.14 by Elizabeth Wardle and Douglas Downs

Guest blogger Nichole Stack has been an instructor with UCF’s Department of Writing and Rhetoric since 2010. Having worked with diverse student populations around the nation and abroad for about 16 years, she has witnessed quite a range of growth in the field of teaching and learning. [read more]

Comments Off on Being Transformers
Categories: Guest Bloggers
Read All Elizabeth Wardle and Douglas Downs

Horizontal divider

We Are All Metamorphs

posted: 4.14.14 by Elizabeth Losh and Jonathan Alexander

Today’s guest blogger, Paula Mathieu, teaches courses at Boston College in composition pedagogy, nonfiction writing, rhetoric, cultural studies, and homeless literature, while also directing the First-Year Writing Program and the Writing Fellows Program.  She is author of Tactics of Hope: The Public Turn in English Composition and co-editor of three essay collections, including Circulating Communities, (2012) co-edited by Stephen Parks and Tiffany Roscoulp.   

Why am I writing this blog entry? While this is either a painfully obvious or deeply philosophical question, it is also deeply rhetorical. [read more]

Comments Off on We Are All Metamorphs
Categories: Guest Bloggers
Read All Elizabeth Losh and Jonathan Alexander

Horizontal divider

The Importance of Teaching Comics Literacy

posted: 12.10.13 by Elizabeth Losh and Jonathan Alexander

Today’s guest blogger is Michael Pemberton, a Professor of Writing and Linguistics at Georgia Southern University, Director of the University Writing Center, and Editor of the online journal Across the Disciplines. He has published five books, including The Ethics of Writing Instruction: Issues in Theory and Practice, The Center Will Hold: Critical Reflections on Writing Center Scholarship, and Bookmarks: A Guide to Research and Writing, 3rd Ed., and more than 90 articles on writing, writing technologies, and writing center research in journals such as College Composition and Communication and Computers and Composition. He has also actively pursued a lifelong interest in sequential art, graphic novels, and the impact these media have had on American culture.

Every fall semester, I teach a course called “Comic Book Writing in American Culture,” an upper-division offering in the department of Writing and Linguistics that attracts not only majors but a variety of interested students across campus. [read more]

Comments Off on The Importance of Teaching Comics Literacy
Categories: Guest Bloggers
Read All Elizabeth Losh and Jonathan Alexander

Horizontal divider

A Re-Vision of Peer Review using Understanding Rhetoric

posted: 11.25.13 by Elizabeth Losh and Jonathan Alexander

This week we welcome guest blogger Molly Scanlon. Molly is an Assistant Professor of Writing at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Her research focuses on visual rhetoric through the study of comics collaborations, educational comics, and public/street art. Scanlon will be featured in a forthcoming collection, The Comics of Joe Sacco: Journalism in a Visual World, edited by Daniel Worden.

[read more]

Comments Off on A Re-Vision of Peer Review using Understanding Rhetoric
Categories: Guest Bloggers
Read All Elizabeth Losh and Jonathan Alexander

Horizontal divider

More than a Textbook

posted: 11.11.13 by Elizabeth Losh and Jonathan Alexander

Today we welcome guest blogger Dr. Jim Haendiges. Jim is an Assistant Professor of English at Dixie State University in Saint George, Utah. He teaches courses on technical and professional writing as well as visual design in documents and multimedia authoring. These courses correspond with his research interests in visual literacy and digital interfaces in education. Apart from his research, Jim likes playing video games with his children and reading comic books to them for bedtime stories.

I was sold on the premise of Understanding Rhetoric even before I saw chapter outlines and mock pages. Comic books have been a hobby and academic interest of mine for several years, and I have been waiting for a textbook like this to use in my classroom instead of presenting my students with Scott McCloud’s Understanding Comics and saying, “Trust me, this type of visual format works for a writing course, too.” Needless to say, I did not need any strong convincing to use Understanding Rhetoric in my college introductory writing course this semester. But I really wasn’t sure how my students would react. [read more]

Comments Off on More than a Textbook
Categories: Guest Bloggers
Read All Elizabeth Losh and Jonathan Alexander

Horizontal divider

Conversation, Writing, and the Role of Comics

posted: 10.28.13 by Elizabeth Losh and Jonathan Alexander

Today we welcome guest blogger Chris Gerben. Chris teaches writing and speaking courses within the Program in Writing and Rhetoric at Stanford University. His research interrogates ways in which students’ extracurricular and/or online writing may be seen as collaborative, argumentative, and academic. You can contact Chris at cgerben@stanford.edu.

 

At the beginning of each semester you may confuse me for a priest holding confessions. Students line up to confide in me that they’re not good writers (despite grades or early writing assignments to the contrary.) [read more]

Comments Off on Conversation, Writing, and the Role of Comics
Categories: Guest Bloggers
Read All Elizabeth Losh and Jonathan Alexander