Archive for the ‘Professional Conferences’ Category

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Mentoring Resources

posted: 5.26.15 by Traci Gardner

This week, I want to share the resources I developed, with help from some colleagues, for mentoring new attendees at the 2015 Computers and Writing Conference in Menomonie, Wisconsin this weekend. Even if you are not going to the conference, I think you’ll find resources that could be helpful to you or someone you know.

We built a website, Computers & Writing Conference Mentoring, which features a collection of resources for first-timers and mentors. The site includes tips and advice, first-timer stories, and suggestions for documenting participation at the conference. [read more]

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Categories: Professional Conferences, Professional Development & Service, Teaching with Technology, Traci Gardner
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The annual CCCC Chair’s Address

posted: 4.9.15 by Andrea Lunsford

OK.  If you have been completely out of touch for a couple of weeks, you’ve missed the CCCC meeting and thus Adam Banks’s 2015 Chair’s Address:  “’Ain’t No Walls Behind the Sky, Baby’: Funk, Flight, Freedom.”  And you’ve missed the thousands of tweets and postings commenting and celebrating it that have populated social media space ever since.  From his opening allusions to George Clinton and Bootsy Collins’s “I’d Rather Be with You” to his final “Thank you CCCC 2015,” Adam held the packed-to-the-rafters ballroom rapt—and with lots of response: the standing ovation was thunderous, and prolonged.  Since then, the presentation has been the subject of much admiration and debate on the WPA listserv.  So right now, whether you were there or not, go watch Adam’s performance [read more]

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Categories: Andrea Lunsford, Pedagogy, Professional Conferences, Professional Development & Service
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Multimodal Mondays: Makin’ it Funky at the 4Cs

posted: 3.30.15 by Andrea Lunsford

Today’s guest blogger is Kim Haimes-Korn.

It is clear that Multimodal Composition is “alive and well” in the field and in our writing classrooms.  I just got back from a great teacher experience at our annual, national Conference on College Composition and Communication — 4Cs — in Tampa, where digital writing is central to the conversation.  In his Chair’s address, “Funk, Flight, and Freedom,” Adam Banks spoke about the ways that the field of composition engages in the “funk.”  By that, he means that we are willing to “sweat and that we will look at all that pains us and still dance.” He extends to talk about the ways flight and freedom have always also been part of our discipline as we continually redefine ourselves in relation to the changing world in which we live. [read more]

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Categories: Andrea Lunsford, Guest Bloggers, Multimodal Mondays, Professional Conferences, Professional Development & Service
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The Other March Madness

posted: 3.26.15 by Andrea Lunsford

I’m just back from Tampa and the 2015 CCCC meeting—what I always think of as “the other March Madness.”  If I’m counting correctly, this was my 45th Cs, consecutive except for 2012, when I was on a round-the-world Semester at Sea adventure.  The earliest meetings I attended were quite small and relatively brief:  it truly did seem as if everyone there knew everyone else.  This year, over 3000 scholar/teachers coursed through the Marriott Harborside and Convention Center from Tuesday evening through Sunday morning.  I felt as though I’d been there a month as I rushed from session to session and met with friends and former students from across the country.  [read more]

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Categories: Andrea Lunsford, Professional Conferences, Professional Development & Service
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Announcing a CCCC Event on Teaching with Understanding Rhetoric

posted: 3.11.15 by Elizabeth Losh and Jonathan Alexander

Have you taught with Understanding Rhetoric by Liz Losh, Jonathan Alexander, Kevin Cannon, and Zander Cannon–or are you curious about teaching with it in the future?

Are you going to 4Cs in Tampa?

If you said yes to both questions, please consider joining us for a panel featuring instructors who have taught with Understanding Rhetoric–plus a chance to share your own ideas and gather some new assignments and teaching tips. [read more]

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Categories: Elizabeth Losh, Jonathan Alexander, Professional Conferences, Professional Development & Service
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CCCC

posted: 2.18.15 by Barclay Barrios

I just made my reservations for the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC).  Wow, some lessons learned.

The first lesson: reserve rooms early.  I couldn’t get into the host hotel or the backup hotel or even the backup, backup hotel.  I’m only about a mile away from the conference but I know from past experience there is no greater pleasure than getting through a long day of panels and then simply stepping into an elevator and collapsing in my room. This year I will be taking a hike before collapsing.  I have to admit I was really kind of shocked. [read more]

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Categories: Barclay Barrios, Professional Conferences, Professional Development & Service
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Why Go to RSA?

posted: 6.1.12 by Andrea Lunsford

I just returned from the biennial Rhetoric Society of America conference, held this year in Philadelphia and chaired with grace and aplomb by Krista Ratcliffe (author of very important works on the power of rhetorical listening).  I certainly did my fair share of listening, and I hope I did so rhetorically, really hearing what others had to say.

Many panels were worth noting—and the keynote speeches (one by Jacqueline Jones Royster and the other by Karlyn Kohrs Campbell and Kathleen Hall Jamieson) were both knockouts.  I loved moving from session to session, hearing brand new as well as seasoned scholars share their work.  So there were many panels I could report on.  But one that struck me in particular was on The Public Work of Rhetoric, and it featured presentations by David Coogan, Linda Flower, Eli Goldblatt, Phyllis Ryder, Katie Kavanagh O’Neill, David Seitz, and David Landes.  Each speaker focused on a program or curriculum or assignment that did some important public work:  Coogan described his collaboration with administrators and inmates at the Richmond City Jail (check out www.openminds.vcu.edu), trying to answer the question of how rhetoric can act in the face of utter despair.  Linda Flower told us about the Community Think Tank, a program that refigures first generation and low-income students as “independent students,” how these students can themselves carry out important intercultural problem solving, and a whole lot more. [read more]

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Categories: Professional Conferences
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Panoptic U

posted: 3.28.12 by Barclay Barrios

I’ve been working on a paper for the NEXUS conference at the University of Tennessee–Knoxville. In a section my paper I consider the ethics of teaching technologies such as Blackboard and, in particular, their “panoptic” potential.  I try to avoid Blackboard whenever possible for a variety of reasons, but this same panopticism is sitting inside Microsoft Word when I grade electronically: I can see when a student last worked on a paper, how they formatted it (double-spaced or just a little extra to make the length?), and even how they revised (using Compare Documents with any earlier draft). The question I ask in the paper is one I pose to you, too: what are the ethical implications when we can see inside students’ composing processes? Any thoughts?

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Categories: Professional Conferences
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Making Effective Arguments for Improved Writing Education

posted: 9.21.11 by Elizabeth Wardle and Douglas Downs

EAW_BW_YFLiz

In my last blog post, I talked about my upcoming trip to Portland to speak to a number of AASCU provosts, vice provosts, and deans. I also mentioned that our WAW grant-related training was in full swing. Now both of these events have passed, and I’d like to share a few things I’ve learned from them. Most importantly: we are all facing a difficult fight to provide students with writing education based in best research-based practices.

I did not know what to expect in the online conversations about writing research and WAW pedagogy. Many of the faculty members who were signed up for the grant training did not know about WAW and had not realized that is what they were getting into. Yet we quickly met many smart, interesting faculty members and TAs at schools of all sizes and shapes who were excited to connect with other faculty members, talk about writing research, and reimagine their writing courses. We had some good online conversations with experienced faculty members, some of whom were approaching writing research for the first time, and came away energized and interested. This was yet another affirmation that the writing research and our own personal experiences continue to speak for themselves in stressing that composition courses as they have been imagined for decades aren’t working. Many people seem to believe this whether they have read the research or not. The research (on transfer, genre theory, and program assessments, for example) can sometimes clarify what experienced teachers have felt for some time.

The NGLC grant project we were part of focused on “blended” learning, and as part of that grant, Debbie Weaver (UCF Composition Coordinator) created some sample modules for a blended learning WAW class to share with participants. However, Debbie and I focused most heavily on the teacher discussion and training, hoping that participants would leave the project with an interest in outcomes and research-based pedagogies rather than on using our sample modules all-inclusively. Thankfully, that was, in fact, what seemed to happen. The participating teachers found their own ways to approach some writing-focused outcomes and developed their courses out of their own expertise and understanding of how writing works. [read more]

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Categories: Professional Conferences, Writing about Writing
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Talking to Our Major Stakeholders about Writing Education

posted: 8.4.11 by Elizabeth Wardle and Douglas Downs

WardleLiz

As I write this, I’m preparing to get on a plane to go to the Summer Conference of the American Association of State College and Universities (AASCU) in Portland, where I will speak to dozens of provosts and vice provosts, as well as a few faculty, about the nature of writing education in American colleges and universities, and why that approach to writing education needs to change. I’ll admit that this talk is about the most difficult thing I have ever tried to write. I’ll speak for an hour, and then potentially work in small groups with provosts and faculty to consider potential “course redesign” at their institutions. They might not be listening at all to my message. But if they do listen, they have the power to return to their home institutions and invest heavily in writing education, just as our president has done at UCF.

I have a few messages for this audience, and finding the right way to frame those messages is proving to be a tricky business. For example:

  • Most of the public and many faculty members feel like writing instruction is failing students.
  • And it is.
  • But not because we don’t know how to improve it.
  • Rather, writing scholars know exactly what needs to be done, but doing it requires top-level intervention to change funding priorities and the culture of writing at all of our institutions.

One of the things that needs to change, I want to tell them, is hiring or training composition faculty who are actually familiar with the relevant research on writing and teaching writing. Up until now, writing has been so important that every student must take classes in it, but also so unimportant that we think anyone can teach it, even if they come from other fields, are hired at the last minute, and are paid less than the school’s janitors. [read more]

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Categories: Professional Conferences
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