Archive for the ‘Argument’ Category

Horizontal divider

Having an Argument, Making an Argument

posted: 11.12.07 by Barclay Barrios

Help students to understand what an academic argument does by getting them to think about other kinds of arguments. Have students review the material on argument in the handbook and then ask them to describe the difference between an argument between lovers, an argument between political candidates, an argument in a courtroom, and a scientific argument. As a follow-up, ask them to describe the difference between “They’re having an argument” and “You have a convincing argument.” This exercise and discussion can be used to think about emotion, evidence, opinion, fact and the ways each can or should play a role in academic writing

Comments Off on Having an Argument, Making an Argument
Categories: Argument, Assignment Idea
Read All Barclay Barrios

Horizontal divider

PowerPoint to get the Power of Points

posted: 10.29.07 by Barclay Barrios

Have students use PowerPoint or other presentation slides in order to reduce their arguments to the most essential elements. Since such slides are most effective when they contain only a few key points, students will have to locate the key elements of their argument; in designing the slides they should consider how visual elements like color, font, and alignment can enhance an argument. Have students review the material in the handbook on visual arguments and oral presentations to give them guidance in this exercise.

Comments Off on PowerPoint to get the Power of Points
Categories: Argument, Assignment Idea, Document Design, Teaching with Technology, Visual Argument
Read All Barclay Barrios

Horizontal divider

From HOCs to LOCs

posted: 10.8.07 by Barclay Barrios

Help students see the relationship between Higher Order Concerns and Lower Order Concerns but directly connecting the two. Students should identify key sentences in their drafts that reflect their intentions in terms of audience, purpose, argument, development, and transition.

Comments Off on From HOCs to LOCs
Categories: Argument, Assignment Idea, Drafting
Read All Barclay Barrios

Horizontal divider

To Keep or Not to Keep

posted: 4.9.07 by Barclay Barrios

At the end of the semester, ask students to generate lists of why they should keep and why they should sell their handbooks. In small groups, have them share these lists and then move into a class discussion about the usefulness of the handbook beyond this class.

Comments Off on To Keep or Not to Keep
Categories: Argument, Assignment Idea, Handbooks, Student Success
Read All Barclay Barrios

Horizontal divider

Visualizing Argument

posted: 3.21.07 by Barclay Barrios

Have students review the material in the handbook on visual arguments or visual aids. Ask them to come to class with a visual supplement to the current reading—a chart or diagram or photograph. In groups, have them share this material and then consider how incorporating it into the essay would enhance or change the author’s argument.

Comments Off on Visualizing Argument
Categories: Argument, Assignment Idea, Collaboration, Document Design, Learning Styles, Visual Argument, Visual Rhetoric
Read All Barclay Barrios

Horizontal divider

Transitional Paragraphs for Understanding

posted: 3.21.07 by Barclay Barrios

Ask students to review the material in the handbook on clarity and transitions, and also ask them to come to class having identified a passage in the current reading that they found particularly confusing. In small groups, students should share their passages and then pick one to work on. The groups will then insert a paragraph before this passage that uses transitions and acts as a transition to help everyone else in the class understand the movement of the author’s argument in this place.

Comments Off on Transitional Paragraphs for Understanding
Categories: Argument, Collaboration, Grammar & Style
Read All Barclay Barrios

Horizontal divider

Audience and Argument

posted: 3.7.07 by Barclay Barrios

Have students review the materials in the handbook on voice, tone, and argument. Have them summarize the argument of their current draft or the current reading and then reword that argument to be sent as a text message on a cell phone, as an instant message online, as a blog posting online, and as a note to their parents. How does medium change message?

Comments Off on Audience and Argument
Categories: Argument, Assignment Idea, Document Design, Drafting, Grammar & Style, Rhetorical Situation, Teaching with Technology, Thesis Statement
Read All Barclay Barrios

Horizontal divider

Condensed Drafts

posted: 2.5.07 by Barclay Barrios

Ask students to review the material on sentence types in the handbook. Then have students take a copy of their current draft (or a portion of it) and revise each sentence down to a subject and verb. Ask students to discuss their condensed drafts in groups: What’s missing when a sentence is reduced to just a subject and verb? Can they make the same argument? What sentence elements are needed for analysis?

Comments Off on Condensed Drafts
Categories: Argument, Collaboration, Grammar & Style
Read All Barclay Barrios

Horizontal divider

Really Using the Passive Voice

posted: 2.5.07 by Barclay Barrios

Have students review the section of the handbook on active and passive voice. Using a key passage from the current reading and working in small groups, have students revise each sentence in the passage into passive voice. (This will require them to identify the subject, the verb, and any objects.) Then use these revised passages in a discussion about the essay. Is the argument weaker when in passive voice? Are concepts clearer? Why or why not? Discuss how they might then use this strategy to check for fragments in their own drafts.

Comments: (1)
Categories: Argument, Collaboration, Grammar & Style, Revising
Read All Barclay Barrios

Horizontal divider

Alternative Titles

posted: 12.18.06 by Barclay Barrios

In class, put students into groups and have them look at the section on titles in the handbook. Ask each group to propose an alternate title for the essay you’re currently working with. Use these to have a discussion about how the title the author did use relates to the essay as well as how the titles groups came up with relate to major ideas from the essay.

Comments Off on Alternative Titles
Categories: Argument, Collaboration, Document Design, Revising
Read All Barclay Barrios