Posts Tagged ‘Collaboration’

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Multimodal Mondays: What Counts as Multimodal? Creating Dialogic Learning Opportunities in Online Discussion Forums

posted: 6.29.15 by Andrea Lunsford

Today’s guest blogger is Jeanne Law-Bohannon.

Every week, I read Andrea’s Multimodal Mondays blog.  I am as much a consumer of the amazing material posted by colleagues as I am a producer of my own content.  Now that summer is upon us, I would like to use my space on the blog to explore expanding examples of multimodal composition, to ask “what counts,” as lessons, assignments, and writing opportunities for students. I also want to investigate how students themselves perceive their learning from multimodal compositions. [read more]

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Categories: Andrea Lunsford, Collaboration, Digital Writing, Multimodal Mondays, Teaching with Technology
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Multimodal Mondays: Radical Revision ~ The Sequel ~ Student Multimodal Hacks

posted: 4.27.15 by Andrea Lunsford

Today’s guest blogger is Kim Haimes-Korn. She continues her series on Radical Revision – and includes assignments and examples of student projects that you don’t want to miss!

In my last post, Radically Revising the Composition Classroom, I challenged others to hack their traditional, tried and true assignments.  I decided to enact this advice in one of my own classes this semester and gave the same challenge to my students, asking them to Radically Revise a collaborative class project through a multimodal lens.   [read more]

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Categories: Andrea Lunsford, Assignment Idea, Digital Writing, Document Design, Guest Bloggers, Multimodal Mondays, Peer Review, Revising, Teaching with Technology
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Peer Groups in the Technology-Enabled Writing Classroom

posted: 4.21.15 by Steve Bernhardt

I suspect we all use peer review in some form or other. If we can help students become effective peer reviewers, then we give them a skill that helps them improve their writing without a teacherly intervention. Peer review makes writing public, so students see what others are doing and learn indirectly. We also help students become valuable workplace writers, because they know how to interact with others to improve writing within an organization. [read more]

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Categories: Collaboration, Pedagogy, Peer Review, Steve Bernhardt, Teaching with Technology, Writing Process
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Multimodal Mondays: Re/Mixing Traditional Academic Essays As YouTube Videos

posted: 4.13.15 by Andrea Lunsford

As I write this week’s post, I am wrapping up an illuminating weekend at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa and its library’s conference Digitorium, where I engaged with colleagues who use critical pedagogy to “do the work” of digital humanities (DH).  There were so many different kinds of re/mixing and re/envisioning happening, that I felt, for the first time, the true interdisciplinarity of DH.  My colleagues were leading students in geocaching and visualizing distance reading data from biblical texts (see Bo Adam’s Presentation). So much of what I saw made me think about how our students really do produce texts for various publics, more and more frequently in digital spaces.  And it also made me think hard about the “doing of DH” and how we, as instructors, don’t have to be IT professionals to find a comfortable praxis in this “doing” and “re/mixing.” [read more]

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Categories: Activity Idea, Assignment Idea, Collaboration, Digital Writing, Grammar & Style, Guest Bloggers, Multimodal Mondays, Teaching with Technology
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Multimodal Mondays: Using Alternate Reality Games (ARGs) to Teach Multimodal Literacies

posted: 4.6.15 by Andrea Lunsford

Today’s guest blogger is Eric Detweiler, a PhD candidate specializing in rhetoric at The University of Texas at Austin, as well as an assistant director in UT’s Digital Writing and Research Lab. His interests lie at the intersections of rhetorical theory and writing pedagogy, and his dissertation puts those two in conversation with the rhetorical ethics of French philosopher Emmanuel Levinas. He also produces a podcast called Rhetoricity and is a student and practitioner of odd puns. More details about his work are available at http://RhetEric.org.

 From 2011-12, I helped plan and implement Battle Lines, an alternate reality game (ARG) designed to teach multimodal literacies in an undergraduate rhetoric and writing course at The University of Texas at Austin. In most cases, ARGs require players to work collaboratively in order to solve clues and puzzles, shifting back and forth between digital and physical environments as they do so [read more]

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Categories: Andrea Lunsford, Audience, Guest Bloggers, Multimodal Mondays
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Ten Visual Collaboration and Sharing Ideas

posted: 3.24.15 by Traci Gardner

Have you ever asked students to brainstorm without words? Thanks to a recent discovery, I’m imagining new possibilities for visual collaboration and sharing using Padlet.

Padlet is a free, online white board tool, which can be used anonymously and collaboratively. I typically set up a board for each class, and students then brainstorm ideas related to recent projects or readings. [read more]

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Categories: Activity Idea, Planning, Traci Gardner
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Is Collaboration the New Normal?

posted: 11.20.14 by Andrea Lunsford

For thirty-plus years now, Lisa Ede and I (and others) have been resisting the notion that writing is a solo activity, rather insisting that writing is essentially collaborative, even when a writer is sitting alone staring at a screen or paper. Opposition to this notion was fierce, and nowhere more so than in the humanities where the image of the solitary writer struggling to create something new under the sun was held sacrosanct. Collaboration was suspect, sure to be “watered down” or “not real writing.” [read more]

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Categories: Andrea Lunsford, Digital Writing
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Celebrating long-term WPA Lisa Ede

posted: 10.23.14 by Andrea Lunsford

In recent months, I’ve followed a fascinating thread on the WPA listserv about members of the rhetoric and writing community who serve as long-term WPAs (writing program administrators). Indeed, it is not unusual for people in our field to be asked to take on administrative jobs: doing so more or less comes with the territory, since the departments we work in usually have writing programs that need guidance and leadership. It is also not unusual for such WPAs to go on to other administrative jobs, including associate deans, deans, provosts, and even presidents. [read more]

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Multimodal Mondays: Working Together to Evaluate a Wikipedia Article

posted: 10.28.13 by Andrea Lunsford

Collaboration is a key part of writing for many people today, and as I’ve noted elsewhere, I’m a big fan of collaborative projects. Here’s an idea for a collaborative project that asks students to evaluate an article from perhaps the most familiar collaborative project of them all, Wikipedia. [read more]

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Katie Salen on Game Design and Learning

posted: 8.13.13 by Traci Gardner

I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about gaming and education recently. In particular, I’m interested in how the underlying structures of game design might apply to the writing classroom. Katie Salen, from the Institute of Play and the Quest to Learn school in New York City, inspired my previous posts aboutbuilding relevance in a writing class and gaming the writing process. [read more]

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Categories: Traci Gardner
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