Posts Tagged ‘composition’

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On Mentoring and Being Mentored

posted: 10.30.14 by Andrea Lunsford

On October 24, 2014, I helped celebrate Lisa Ede’s retirement: her department at Oregon State University put on a one-day conference, called “Situating Composition” (the title of one of Lisa’s influential books), and Cheryl Glenn and I had the honor of giving talks at the conference. In addition to our presentations, we enjoyed two fabulous panels: one made up of current MA students at Oregon State, each of whom spoke for about ten minutes about their current research, which ranged from peer tutoring to comic books to dual credit composition programs. These MA students were smart, witty, and full of wonderful ideas. The other panel featured Oregon State alums, and each of these former students spoke briefly about the important role Lisa had played in their education, about her careful and attentive mentoring of them. When the day came to a close, the organizers had a big surprise for Lisa: Cheryl and I had the very great pleasure of announcing the Lisa Ede Mentoring Award, which will be given annually by the Coalition of Women Scholars in the History of Rhetoric and Composition to someone who embodies Lisa’s mentoring ideals and values. It was a festive and moving and memorable moment, and I got to watch as it dawned on Lisa that the CWSHRC was establishing an award in her honor. Pure happiness. [read more]

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Categories: Andrea Lunsford, Collaboration
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“Felt Sense” and Expository Writing

posted: 9.24.14 by Barclay Barrios

I just finished rereading Sondra Perl’s essay “Understanding Composing” reproduced in the excellent Bedford resource Teaching Composition: Background Readings. I’m teaching Perl in our pedagogy course for new graduate teaching assistants, ENC 6700 Introduction to Composition Theory and Methodology; the essays forms part of a cluster of readings on drafting and audience. [read more]

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Word Crimes

posted: 8.6.14 by Barclay Barrios

“Weird Al” Yankovic has a new video that swept the internet: “Word Crimes” a parody of Robin Thicke’s controversial hit “Blurred Lines.”  It’s a fun song and video with some interesting potential for the writing classroom. [read more]

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Categories: Barclay Barrios
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Emerging 3e: Ideas?

posted: 7.30.14 by Barclay Barrios

I’m headed to Boston this weekend and that has me pumped, for two reasons.  First it means time with my partner (woo hoo). Second it means that we’re starting work on Emerging 3e (super woo hoo). I’ll be meeting with my Bedford editor (Beditor?) to go over reviews for the next edition, and I have already dashed off my own cockamamie ideas. [read more]

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Categories: Barclay Barrios
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Who Gets to Teach Composition?

posted: 7.16.14 by Barclay Barrios

In the aftermath of our SACSCOC accreditation, our school is sending around a terminal degree list, the idea being that departments should specify what degrees get to teach which classes.  Currently, the rules allow any terminal degree in English to teach any course in English—I could teach the Victorian Novel or creative writing, even though I know almost nothing about either.  In some ways, then, specifying which degrees go with which courses sounds like a great idea, though of course it’s more complicated than that—particularly when it comes to composition. [read more]

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How Comics Can Be an Entry Point to Prose Novels

posted: 5.30.14 by Elizabeth Losh and Jonathan Alexander

Today’s guest blogger is Daniel Jose Ruiz, assistant professor and Vice-Chair of English/ESL at Los Angeles City College. Daniel teaches a wide range of courses, from basic skills to literature, but his emphasis is always on fostering a student’s engagement with a text. Daniel is also known for using a variety of materials ranging from YA literature and SF/Fantasy to canonical works.

Imagine that you learned two languages primarily aurally and visually. You did not receive much, if any, formal education in literacy in either language. You were taught to read, but only to the extent that you can navigate the world. [read more]

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Categories: Guest Bloggers
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We Are All Metamorphs

posted: 4.14.14 by Elizabeth Losh and Jonathan Alexander

Today’s guest blogger, Paula Mathieu, teaches courses at Boston College in composition pedagogy, nonfiction writing, rhetoric, cultural studies, and homeless literature, while also directing the First-Year Writing Program and the Writing Fellows Program.  She is author of Tactics of Hope: The Public Turn in English Composition and co-editor of three essay collections, including Circulating Communities, (2012) co-edited by Stephen Parks and Tiffany Roscoulp.   

Why am I writing this blog entry? While this is either a painfully obvious or deeply philosophical question, it is also deeply rhetorical. [read more]

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Categories: Guest Bloggers
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MOOCs and Comics

posted: 3.14.14 by Elizabeth Losh and Jonathan Alexander

In the composition community, there has been a lot of discussion about the efficacy and difficult of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) that may enroll tens of thousands of students in courses designed around video lectures, online quizzes, and peer grading of assignments. [read more]

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My Advice to Students

posted: 12.10.13 by Traci Gardner

With the semester nearly over here at Virginia Tech, I keep thinking about what will happen when the first-year writing students I am teaching move on to the second semester of the course and a new teacher. I worry about both whether they are prepared and how I can make that transition easier for them. [read more]

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Reconsidering Plagiarism Prevention

posted: 4.5.13 by archived

For me, the issue had been decided six or seven years ago, under the influence of the comp bloggers I was reading at the time, who were for the most part solidly opposed to the use of automated plagiarism-detection software.  Their arguments were convincing: such software raised intellectual property concerns when it added student essays to its database and ethical concerns when it profited from those additions; and even more worrisome, it created a police-state climate in the classroom (for an extensive discussion of the potential resulting damage, see the comments here).

But lately around my campus, now that Turnitin has been integrated into our CMS, I keep hearing from colleagues whose judgments I respect about how valuable they find its services. One lauded how much time its grammar checker saves him in grading, and another pointed to its value in teaching students where their semi-digested paraphrases have slid into “patchwriting” (Rebecca Moore Howard’s term). At a presentation last week, when I explained my preference for course and student blogs over the institutional CMS, a science faculty member asked how I dealt with plagiarism (without the aid of Turnitin) and how much time did it take? (My response, of course, was the laugh all writing teachers give to faculty of other disciplines who dare to complain about time spent grading.) [read more]

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Categories: Holly Pappas
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