Posts Tagged ‘ethics’

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Ten Ethical Scenarios for Professional Writing

posted: 6.23.15 by Traci Gardner

Last week, I proposed a compass-based activity for Discussing Ethics Scenarios in Professional Writing classes. This week I’m sharing ten scenarios to use with last week’s ethical compass. Most of the scenarios have alternative solutions or choices that you can discuss beyond the simple choice of where the situation falls on the ethical compass. [read more]

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Categories: Business Writing, Traci Gardner
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Discussing Ethics Scenarios in Professional Writing

posted: 6.16.15 by Traci Gardner

Last week, I posted an activity where students compared codes of ethics from different disciplines. Today, I’m sharing an activity that asks students to apply those codes to some simple scenarios. It’s a bridge activity between examining the codes and discussing more detailed and complex case studies. Like last week’s post, this activity grew out of the Pathways Summer Institute, sponsored by the Virginia Tech Office of General Education. [read more]

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Categories: Traci Gardner
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Professional Writing and Codes of Ethics

posted: 6.9.15 by Traci Gardner

This week, I want to talk about an activity for a professional writing course that explores the ethical principles that apply to professional writers. Students will return to these principles throughout the term. This idea grew from work I did last week at the Pathways Summer Institute, sponsored by the Virginia Tech Office of General Education. [read more]

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Categories: Activity Idea, Business Writing, Traci Gardner, WAC/WID
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The Shadow of the Chuckle Patch: Teaching Students Who Will Never Be English Majors

posted: 4.16.14 by Barclay Barrios

Today’s guest blogger is Anthony Lioi—an ecocritic, Americanist, and compositionist who works at the Juilliard School, where he also directs the Writing Center. He earned the BA at Brown University and the MA and Ph.D. at Rutgers University and held positions at Rutgers and MIT before taking his current position. [read more]

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Categories: Barclay Barrios
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When Professors (and Politicians) Plagiarize

posted: 6.20.11 by archived

A few weeks ago I posted about graduation speeches. Well, the dean of medicine at the University of Alberta (Canada) has just been accused of plagiarizing a speech that he gave at a graduation reception June 10. Dr. Philip Baker has admitted there was a “failure to attribute the source of my inspiration.” Notably, he doesn’t use the word plagiarism. Yet students claim that he lifted the speech word-for-word from a speech given by the doctor, professor, and best-selling author Atul Gawande at Stanford University last year.

This is by no means the first scandal regarding a plagiarized speech, nor is it likely to be the last. You might remember that Vice President Joe Biden was accused of plagiarism in 2008. His defense was that he didn’t know how to cite the original source. “If I had intended to cheat,” he said, “would I have been so stupid?”

Baker’s and Biden’s “mistakes” are things we can talk about in class. They illustrate how serious (and sometimes complicated) plagiarism is and demonstrate that plagiarism isn’t just something that teachers drill into students, but a larger cultural phenomenon. I also think it’s important to examine the excuses, explanations, and repercussions. [read more]

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Categories: Jay Dolmage, Plagiarism
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