Posts Tagged ‘online course’

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Multimodal Mondays: Re/Mixing Composition and Technical Writing with an Online Course

posted: 3.16.15 by Andrea Lunsford

As I wrote in my recent post, this semester has been a reflective opportunity for me, in terms of re/vising multimodal writing assignments and how we can apply multimodal composition across genres and contexts.  In keeping with my theme of re/mix, I want to discuss how a multimodal composition looks when applied to a graduate school context.  Most of us have taught or currently teach first-year writing.  Accordingly, we discuss our pedagogies that apply to those classes, which provides a wealth of sharable information for our peers. Too often, however, I think we anchor composition pedagogies to first-year experiences only. This week, I offer a re/mix of multimodal blogging, contextualized for an online graduate course in information design.   The re/mixed blogging project could also be easily re/vised to work in most writing or technical communication courses. [read more]

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Categories: Assignment Idea, Digital Writing, Guest Bloggers, Teaching with Technology
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Professional Bio Assignment

posted: 6.11.14 by Traci Gardner

In July, I will begin teaching an online section of Technical Writing. The course takes place completely online. I’ll never meet with the students in a face-to-face classroom, and there will be no set meeting time for the class. Students will log in whenever they like and access resources on the course website and in Virginia Tech’s CMS. [read more]

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Categories: Traci Gardner
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Making My Teaching Beliefs

posted: 7.25.13 by Traci Gardner

Somehow, I have escaped writing a teaching philosophy for a long time. In fact, I’m not positive that I ever have written one. If I did, it would have been some twenty years ago, and I have no idea where I’d find it now. It’s not that I haven’t thought about what I value as a teacher. I blog about what matters every week. I just haven’t had to write an official statement—until now. [read more]

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Categories: Traci Gardner
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My #clmooc Journey So Far

posted: 7.16.13 by Traci Gardner

I’m now a month into the National Writing Project’s MOOC, Making Learning Connected (#clmooc). I adore the projects people are sharing as part of the course. If you want to see some of the projects, peek in on the Google Community where we have been sharing our work.

The course focused on maps during Make Cycle 3, which took place during the third week. Our project was simply to make a map of some kind. [read more]

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Categories: Traci Gardner
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The Choices of WEXMOOC

posted: 7.2.13 by Traci Gardner

By the time this post is published, I will have finished The Ohio State University’s Writing II: Rhetorical Composing Course (#WEXMOOC), and I hope that I will have managed to squeak through with a Statement of Accomplishment with Distinction. It wasn’t the five compositions or the requirements for peer review that were the biggest challenge to earning that distinction. It was the seven Check Your Progress activities. [read more]

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Categories: Traci Gardner
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Comparing MOOCs: #WEXMOOC vs. #clmooc

posted: 6.25.13 by Traci Gardner

A student trying to decide whether a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) fits her needs will probably turn first to the course site, which, at a minimum, has as a webpage overview and a video introduction to the course. Today, I want to consider what introductory videos for two different courses I’ve enrolled in tell me about the courses themselves. [read more]

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Categories: Traci Gardner
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cMOOCs and xMOOCs

posted: 6.18.13 by Traci Gardner

Two weeks ago, I talked about The Misunderstood MOOC, the differences between the first MOOCs and the MOOCs now being developed by companies like Coursera and EDx. As I was preparing to write this week’s post, I came upon an extended conversation of these two kinds of MOOCs between social community builder and teacher Howard Rheingold and senior fellow at the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education, Bryan Alexander. [read more]

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Categories: Traci Gardner
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Debriefing the MOOC

posted: 8.31.12 by archived

To start my promised report on my MOOC MOOC experience, I’m embarrassed to admit that, like 90% of the students who enroll in a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), I did not complete the course.  (You can find this figure, along with much more info about MOOCs, on the Chronicle of Higher Education’s page “What You Need to Know about MOOC’s.”) Given the general attitude that it was fine to jump in and do as much or little as one wished, this was no big deal, and even my limited participation both taught me a lot and raised a lot of questions.

The speed of the course did me in, with so much to read and watch and produce in a single week. The demands of life that prevented me from engaging as deeply as I would have liked served to remind me of the “real-life” pressures my community college students face.  I also reflected on the usefulness of deadlines: to what extent their pressure is necessary to get work done and how they serve the practical need for students to be at similar places in order to share and reflect on each other’s products, but also how the difficulty in meeting one deadline can derail student progress in the entire course. For my own courses, it led me to think about what interventions I might make to help in these types of situations, that seem so common for my students. [read more]

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Categories: Holly Pappas
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