Posts Tagged ‘presentation’

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Multimodal Mondays: Prezis and Source Use: Engaging in a Multimodal Annotated Bibliography

posted: 3.23.15 by Andrea Lunsford

Jessie Miller is a Master’s Candidate in Written Communication at Eastern Michigan University, where she teaches first-year composition and consults in the University Writing Center. In her Master’s project, she uses discourse analysis to analyze the language First-Year Writing instructors use in assignment sheets where they ask their students to compose digitally. Her research (and her Master’s degree) will be completed in April 2015. 

Since I began teaching, I have been increasingly interested in the role technology plays in the composition classroom. Last year at Cs, I presented a digital pedagogy poster on how I engaged with social media and technology in my classroom. For one of the large projects of the semester I assigned a multimodal transformation of my students’ research essays. They had to re-envision their essay on a social media platform of their choosing (i.e. Tumblr, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, etc.). As I worked through this assignment with my class, I found myself negotiating the affordances and limitations of each platform with my students. Digital multimodal projects, I had realized, could easily become unwieldy. [read more]

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Categories: Digital Writing, Guest Bloggers, Multimodal Mondays, Presentations, Research
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Multimodal Mondays: PechaKucha Proposals

posted: 2.23.15 by Andrea Lunsford

In many classrooms, multimodal presentations are becoming par for the (composition) course, and other Bits authors and Multimodal Mondays bloggers have shared ways to take presentations beyond PowerPoint (see “Composing Identities with Literacies Experience Timelines” and “When to Prezi” for examples). Instructors are thinking not only about different types of presentations but about different ways—and contexts—to use presentations. Traditionally, presentations have been cumulative, a capstone on a well-developed research project. But presentations can also be useful tools for invention and for establishing a writing community in your classroom. Added benefits are building visual literacy and giving a platform for visual learners to brainstorm and share their ideas. [read more]

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Categories: Activity Idea, Andrea Lunsford, Audience, Multimodal Mondays, Visual Argument, Visual Rhetoric
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Multimodal Mondays: Showcasing Student Work

posted: 5.5.14 by Andrea Lunsford

Even the most motivated students can feel discouraged knowing that the projects they poured their time and energy into will be filed away and forgotten when the course term ends. Even the most rhetorically minded writers can feel frustrated simply imagining an ideal audience rather than actually composing for one. [read more]

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Categories: Andrea Lunsford
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Free, Classroom-Ready Visual Texts from CreativeCloud

posted: 9.29.09 by Traci Gardner

Have you ever wondered what would happen If You Printed The Internet? According to the CreativeCloud site, you’d need 700 square miles of paper. No word on how many reams that would be, but it’s certainly part of a great visual argument.

At first glance, the page is just a clever meme, rethinking the size of the Internet in more familiar terms. The techniques that the author, identified as Tom, uses however are well worth a second look. The presentation lends itself to some great discussion about visual arguments. You might try these discussion questions with students after reading through the series of slides:

  • How did the author make certain words stand out? What makes them “pop”?
  • How does word choice matter? For instance, why is it “If YOU Printed the Internet”? Why use that pronoun?
  • How are images used? Why did the author choose general clip art images?
  • What underlying arguments does the series of slides present? What points is the author trying to make?
  • Why use comparisons to make this argument clear to the audience?
  • Does the presentation work? Would it work as well in another kind of document (e.g., an essay, a podcast)?

After exploring the presentation, you could ask students to make similar visual arguments on topics of their own choice.

Don’t stop with If You Printed The Internet either. There are a number of great resources on the CreativeCloud site. Be sure that you consider these other visual texts that can be used in class:

30 Sensational Print Ads From Around The World
Visit this treasure trove of unusual advertisements for outstanding examples of ad analysis and visual argument. The images are scanned from print advertisement. Some may be inappropriate for the school where you teach, so be sure to preview them in advance and choose those you want to use. After exploring how these ads work, students might look for other sensational ads in magazines they read or compare these contemporary ads to ads from the 30s to the 60s.
6 Massive Old School Printers (& How They Were Advertised)
Most of the students we teach today always thought of computers and printers as something that you could have in your home. Challenge them to compare today’s ads for printers and other technology to these great ads from the 50s, 60s, and 70s. According to a recent New York Times article, today’s technology ads focus more on benefits and friendly language than complex specs. Students can compare how benefits and specs were discussed in these older ads to the ads of today. If those ideas don’t pique your interest, these technology ads are ripe for discussions of race, class, and gender.
10 Beautiful Illustrations From Seriously Rare Books
Ask students to consider what makes the illustrations beautiful and what they add to the texts. Challenge students to visit the campus library and search out additional illustrations that they would add to the collection, or ask them to update the collection to show 10 beautiful illustrations from 20th or 21st century books.

There’s much more on the CreativeCloud site, and additional resources seem to be posted every month. Be sure to check the site periodically for new materials you can use in the classroom. Even if you don’t find something for class, you’ll find some interesting images like these 9 Amazing 3D Pavement Paintings or the 30 Amazing Pictures of Forest Fires.

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Categories: Assignment Idea, Document Design, Popular Culture, Visual Argument, Visual Rhetoric
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PowerPoint to get the Power of Points

posted: 10.29.07 by Barclay Barrios

Have students use PowerPoint or other presentation slides in order to reduce their arguments to the most essential elements. Since such slides are most effective when they contain only a few key points, students will have to locate the key elements of their argument; in designing the slides they should consider how visual elements like color, font, and alignment can enhance an argument. Have students review the material in the handbook on visual arguments and oral presentations to give them guidance in this exercise.

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Categories: Argument, Assignment Idea, Document Design, Teaching with Technology, Visual Argument
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Section Intro: The Vita

posted: 6.1.07 by archived

You are not your Vita, but you will certainly not get hired or published without having one. All jobs require a vita, even if some employers now refer to them as resumes (rare, but it does happen). Either way, it is vital that you keep your vita updated and accurate–many professionals keep theirs available online.

This section will focus on issues surrounding the Vita, effective presentation and wording, how readers view items on the Vita, and how different institutions may regard and value the different lines on your Vita.

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Categories: Adjunct Advice, Gregory Zobel
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