Posts Tagged ‘Professional Development’

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Collaboration at the Santa Fe Indian School

posted: 4.23.15 by Andrea Lunsford

When Susan Miera—who did her MA degree at the Bread Loaf School of English and is a leader in the Bread Loaf Teacher Network—invited me to join her and colleagues and students in Santa Fe, I jumped at the chance.  I’ve known “Ms. Miera,” as she is lovingly known by legions of high schoolers, for many years, and I’ve worked with a number of Native American students she has mentored—and sent to Stanford.  She’s a whirlwind of energy, and I know that I will always learn something new from her.  This visit was no exception. [read more]

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Categories: Activity Idea, Andrea Lunsford, Pedagogy, Professional Development & Service, Teaching Advice
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CCCC

posted: 2.18.15 by Barclay Barrios

I just made my reservations for the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC).  Wow, some lessons learned.

The first lesson: reserve rooms early.  I couldn’t get into the host hotel or the backup hotel or even the backup, backup hotel.  I’m only about a mile away from the conference but I know from past experience there is no greater pleasure than getting through a long day of panels and then simply stepping into an elevator and collapsing in my room. This year I will be taking a hike before collapsing.  I have to admit I was really kind of shocked. [read more]

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Categories: Barclay Barrios, Professional Conferences, Professional Development & Service
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The Teachable TOACA

posted: 2.11.15 by Barclay Barrios

I’ve recently come to realize that I am now what I would consider a “TOACA,” a Teacher of a Certain Age.  Granted, that has more to do with chronobiological age than professional longevity.  And let me be clear that it’s not that I feel like things are “over” (thank goodness). Still, there is a certain sense that I am reaching the top of the hill, so to speak, no matter how long it may be on the other side.  This realization has prompted quite a bit of reflection about my life and career. One of the things I’ve decided is that it is time for me to be teachable again. [read more]

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Categories: Activity Idea, Barclay Barrios, Classroom Challenges and Solutions, Teaching Advice
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Video? Video!

posted: 2.4.15 by Barclay Barrios

I’ve been playing around with video since the Flip cameras were big—so about 7 or 8 years now.  As the cameras on cell phones got better and better, I moved to just using my iPhone 5s to capture video.  iMovie has given me good results for the longest time but having just purchased a Retina 5K iMac, I’ve decided to take the plunge and move to Final Cut Pro X.  Prosumer ho! [read more]

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Categories: Barclay Barrios, Emerging, Teaching with Technology
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Trigger Warnings

posted: 12.10.14 by Barclay Barrios

I learned about trigger warnings for the first time this semester.

Trigger warnings, whether presented on syllabi or before class readings, warn students that material in the course (such as content on sexual abuse, war, or rape) could trigger those suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).  At the very start of the semester I learned about them when one of our Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) approached me about a student in her class. [read more]

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What Do GTAs Learn?

posted: 12.3.14 by Barclay Barrios

Our last guest blogger for this round is Rachel Hartnett.  Rachel is a first-year MA student at Florida Atlantic University, where she is studying science fiction and fantasy literature. She is also a journalist with MuggleNet.com, the number one Harry Potter fan site in the world. She lives in Lake Worth with her cat, Snidely.

 What I like about Rachel’s post is her reflection on what she has learned about herself as a teacher and as a student.  I think about the role of Graduate Teaching Assistants quite a bit (because we use so many of them in our program).  They often seem to occupy a deeply liminal space in the institution—neither a teacher nor a student but both.  I frequently observe some of the negative consequences of this liminality in terms of things like pay and benefits.  What Rachel reminds me, though, is that the in-betweeness of GTAs also opens a space for learning and growth. [read more]

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Categories: Barclay Barrios, Guest Bloggers
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Dual Identities

posted: 11.12.14 by Barclay Barrios

This week’s guest blogger has chosen to remain anonymous, for reasons that I think this post makes clear.  I’ll admit that it has prompted me to reflect on my own published digital presence.  But, more pressingly, it makes me wonder about asking students to blog or write for public audiences.  Could there be issues we have not yet addressed in such a practice?

I made two honest attempts at this blog post. But each time I wrote, I found that what I had written could potentially compromise my role as an instructor. What do I mean by that? I mean that in the future, when students Google me, this blog post will probably pop up, and when they read what I have written they will think differently about me. So what’s the harm in that? Well, for one thing, by then I will probably have changed my ideas about what I have written. And for another, whatever information I post online can be tied back to me for a very, very long time. [read more]

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On Mentoring and Being Mentored

posted: 10.30.14 by Andrea Lunsford

On October 24, 2014, I helped celebrate Lisa Ede’s retirement: her department at Oregon State University put on a one-day conference, called “Situating Composition” (the title of one of Lisa’s influential books), and Cheryl Glenn and I had the honor of giving talks at the conference. In addition to our presentations, we enjoyed two fabulous panels: one made up of current MA students at Oregon State, each of whom spoke for about ten minutes about their current research, which ranged from peer tutoring to comic books to dual credit composition programs. These MA students were smart, witty, and full of wonderful ideas. The other panel featured Oregon State alums, and each of these former students spoke briefly about the important role Lisa had played in their education, about her careful and attentive mentoring of them. When the day came to a close, the organizers had a big surprise for Lisa: Cheryl and I had the very great pleasure of announcing the Lisa Ede Mentoring Award, which will be given annually by the Coalition of Women Scholars in the History of Rhetoric and Composition to someone who embodies Lisa’s mentoring ideals and values. It was a festive and moving and memorable moment, and I got to watch as it dawned on Lisa that the CWSHRC was establishing an award in her honor. Pure happiness. [read more]

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Categories: Andrea Lunsford, Collaboration
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Those Who Can

posted: 10.29.14 by Barclay Barrios

My guest blogger today, Jenn Murray, has spent the last 16 years as a Midwesterner trying to adjust to life in South Florida. After many years at home with her children, Jenn is currently in her first year of the MA program at Florida Atlantic University, where she is studying multicultural literature and trying to narrow her research interests enough for a thesis.

Jenn’s post isn’t only about the stages we all go through in emerging as teachers.  It’s also about the ways in which teaching makes us better writers.  I have to admit—I never thought about this before.  But in taking a moment to reflect I realize she’s absolutely right.  When I am writing an article I have a much sharper sense of my argument and what it needs to do, a clearer sense of my organization and the moves I want to make, and a surer understanding of what evidence I want to bring to bear.  A lot of that comes from experience in the discipline but now I can see how parts of it come from teaching writing.  Cool.

I know you’ve heard the saying.  We’ve all heard it at one point or another.  “Those who can, do. Those who can’t, teach.”  It’s one of those snarky comments that get tossed around without much thought, but I am doing a lot of thinking about it right now. [read more]

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Discourses of Teaching

posted: 10.22.14 by Barclay Barrios

Today’s guest blogger is Jason Stephens, a native of Boise, Idaho who has recently moved to Boca Raton, Florida, where he is a first year MFA student at Florida Atlantic University. Jason has been deeply involved in bicycle touring since graduating from Boise State (where he earned his BA), which has allowed for a growing sense of importance in finding purpose for the self in all activities and interactions.

 Jason struggled with this post, trying to find the best ways to convey his felt sense that what he said in the classroom and how he said it directly affected what and how students wrote. [read more]

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