Posts Tagged ‘professional writing’

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Ten Ethical Scenarios for Professional Writing

posted: 6.23.15 by Traci Gardner

Last week, I proposed a compass-based activity for Discussing Ethics Scenarios in Professional Writing classes. This week I’m sharing ten scenarios to use with last week’s ethical compass. Most of the scenarios have alternative solutions or choices that you can discuss beyond the simple choice of where the situation falls on the ethical compass. [read more]

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Categories: Business Writing, Traci Gardner
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Discussing Ethics Scenarios in Professional Writing

posted: 6.16.15 by Traci Gardner

Last week, I posted an activity where students compared codes of ethics from different disciplines. Today, I’m sharing an activity that asks students to apply those codes to some simple scenarios. It’s a bridge activity between examining the codes and discussing more detailed and complex case studies. Like last week’s post, this activity grew out of the Pathways Summer Institute, sponsored by the Virginia Tech Office of General Education. [read more]

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Categories: Traci Gardner
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Professional Writing and Codes of Ethics

posted: 6.9.15 by Traci Gardner

This week, I want to talk about an activity for a professional writing course that explores the ethical principles that apply to professional writers. Students will return to these principles throughout the term. This idea grew from work I did last week at the Pathways Summer Institute, sponsored by the Virginia Tech Office of General Education. [read more]

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Categories: Activity Idea, Business Writing, Traci Gardner, WAC/WID
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Talking about Audience and Social Media

posted: 5.19.15 by Traci Gardner

While the students I teach are typically adept at personal uses of social media, they often need to learn how to use digital tools for professional purposes as they prepare for their future careers.

This week, I had a personal experience that will make a great discussion starter to talk with students about audience and social media. It all started with my decision to replace my three-year-old phone while keeping my unlimited data plan. I went into the Verizon store and said I needed two things: I wanted to buy a new phone at full price, and I did not want to change my contract in anyway. [read more]

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Categories: Digital Writing, Traci Gardner
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Writers as Class Guests

posted: 5.20.14 by Steve Bernhardt

Teaching can be an isolating profession, as Dan Lortie underscored in his classic Schoolteacher (U. Chicago, 1975, reissued 2002). Teachers tend to be isolated inside classroom walls with only their students. But classrooms can also be connected—the walls can be porous.

Three guest speakers joined my Introduction to Professional Writing class last week, and I think we all connected. [read more]

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Categories: Steve Bernhardt
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Multimodal Mondays: Interviewing Writers in Other Disciplines and Professions

posted: 2.17.14 by Andrea Lunsford

Do your students understand enough about writing they will do for their major or in their eventual career? This assignment suggests ways to get your students involved in collecting information about writing in various disciplines—and in professions outside of academia as well. [read more]

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Categories: Andrea Lunsford
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Multimodal Mondays: Introducing the Academic Environment with Email

posted: 2.3.14 by Andrea Lunsford

Today’s multimodal assignment comes to us from Molly Scanlon, an Assistant Professor of Writing at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Shanti Bruce, Associate Professor of Writing at Nova Southeastern University, found that her colleagues were turned off by the informal and unprofessional writing in student emails, so she designed an assignment that would be taught in all composition courses in the first week of classes each semester. [read more]

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Categories: Andrea Lunsford
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Writing is a Public Act: Take Two

posted: 3.29.13 by archived

When I wrote my last blog post on my “Writing is A Public Act” policy, I didn’t anticipate that it would be a two-fer, but that’s how it has turned out. In that post, I ended up thinking about how having access to student writing via the LMS and Google Docs is useful to me as a writing teacher in the Paperless Writing Class. What I didn’t articulate is why I think this policy is worthwhile for the students and that’s what I’d like to take up here.

Let me say from the outset that the writing I’m talking about here is not of the personal sort–I’m not looking for students to do a freewrite on a significant relationship in their lives and then insisting that they allow me to share that freewrite with the class. That’s not what I have in mind. I’m talking about the kind of writing students do when they’re working through ideas or asking questions or reacting to something they’ve read or we’ve discussed. Let’s take an example.

[read more]

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Categories: Michael Michaud
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Writing Wikis

posted: 3.12.13 by Steve Bernhardt

This spring, I am teaching “Introduction to Professional Writing” to a group of 35 undergraduates who are choosing to concentrate in professional writing within our English major. We are exploring career options, developing ePortfolios, gaining familiarity with some central research and theory, developing tools, and imagining what the future holds for writers in workplaces. We are in the middle of a wiki assignment this week, and it is proving to be a challenging rhetorical task.

I have the class divided into teams of five, and each team must make two contributions to TCBOK—the Technical Communication Body of Knowledge wiki. This project is sponsored by the Society for Technical Communication with the purpose of gathering career-related information into a central resource for the profession. Students can choose to contribute new content to one of the many nodes that are at this time content placeholders, or they can choose to further develop and improve existing material. I tend to like the latter option, since so much workplace writing involves reworking existing texts for new purposes and audiences. Students don’t yet appreciate that, so most choose to develop new content. [read more]

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Categories: Steve Bernhardt
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