Posts Tagged ‘Twitter’

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Talking about Audience and Social Media

posted: 5.19.15 by Traci Gardner

While the students I teach are typically adept at personal uses of social media, they often need to learn how to use digital tools for professional purposes as they prepare for their future careers.

This week, I had a personal experience that will make a great discussion starter to talk with students about audience and social media. It all started with my decision to replace my three-year-old phone while keeping my unlimited data plan. I went into the Verizon store and said I needed two things: I wanted to buy a new phone at full price, and I did not want to change my contract in anyway. [read more]

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Categories: Digital Writing, Traci Gardner
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What are the differences between speaking and writing?

posted: 11.6.14 by Andrea Lunsford

I can still remember where I was when I opened my copy of College Composition and Communication (the May 1977 issue) and turned to Janet Emig’s “Writing as a Mode of Learning.” I had recently submitted my dissertation and was in that grad student’s limbo, waking every morning with the panicky thought that “I’ve GOT to finish my dissertation” only to realize that I had, indeed, done so, and preparing to move from the university that had been my home for five years to a new and scary “first Ph.D. job” in Vancouver, Canada.  I was sitting on the floor in my tiny bedroom in Columbus, Ohio, where I had written a lot of the dissertation, and I’d taken a break from sorting through stacks of sources and files to read the new CCC. [read more]

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Multimodal Mondays: Day in the Life: A DIY Assignment Using Immediate Media, Archives, and Animation to Engage Student-Scholars in Digital, Public Writing

posted: 11.3.14 by Andrea Lunsford

Students encounter public writing every day of their lives. While they are often critical consumers of such multimodal rhetorics, they more often need their teachers to guide them towards critical production of everyday public rhetorics. They need us to help them to decide invention—what it is they want to say; to discern arrangement and style—how are they going to say it; and to revise—prepare it for an audience who, like them, consumes more digital than printed texts.

If your students are like mine, they have a general distaste for “Dear Teacher” essays, preferring instead to produce critical compositions that carry meaning for them and their peers in popular culture. At SPSU, I have further found that students like to create performative texts on cultural topics of their choosing. While I understand, and usually agree, that self-choice of writing topics develops student stakeholders, in a first-year, first-semester composition course, students often need some structure while exploring cultural identities. The assignment I am writing about this week provides a DIY-packaged compromise that gives students opportunities to curate media from a specific cultural experience while maintaining the consistency that is sometimes necessary for first-year writing instruction. For this assignment, students will tweet, archive their tweets, then produce a 30-second expository animation that describes a “day in the life” of an identity they embody. [read more]

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Categories: Activity Idea, Assignment Idea, Guest Bloggers, Multimodal Mondays, Uncategorized
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Multimodal Mondays – Fight Club and Social Media: Teaching Students the Importance of Conceding

posted: 10.13.14 by Andrea Lunsford

Eric Stephens is a graduate instructor at Utah State University. His research interests lie where popular culture, religion, pedagogy, and writing center theory and practice intersect. He has presented his work at several university symposiums and plans to present his most recent research at the International Writing Centers Association conference. You can reach Eric via his website and follow him on Twitter @eric_james86.

When I taught argumentation, the importance of conceding evaded my students. After some reflection, I realized I needed a new plan. [read more]

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Categories: Andrea Lunsford, Guest Bloggers
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Multimodal Mondays: Tweet Me, Tweet You: Using Twitter and Storify to Build Classroom Community in a Flipped First-Year Composition Course

posted: 9.22.14 by Andrea Lunsford

Guest blogger Jeanne Law Bohannon is an Assistant Professor in the Digital Writing and Media Arts (DWMA) Department at Southern Polytechnic State University.  She believes in creating democratic learning spaces, where students become accountable for their own growth though authentic engagement in class communities. [read more]

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#f**kphyllis: Teaching Phyllis Wise

posted: 2.12.14 by Barclay Barrios

Snow days… I remember them from my twelve years at Rutgers, though I must obnoxiously admit that lately I’ve had the AC on here in warm-but-slightly-muggy Florida.  My current institution is thus immune from the controversy that recently enveloped the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne when Chancellor Phyllis Wise declined to cancel school for snow, prompting an outpouring of hate in social media, much of it grouped under the odious hashtag #f**kphyllis. [read more]

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Online Support Networks for Writers

posted: 11.15.13 by Nedra Reynolds

Leaves are flying off the trees, and darkness descends in the late afternoon, so it must be November.  A good month for NaNoWriMo!  Or maybe AcWriMo!  Which inspirational online support network is right for you?

Write-with-an-online-community movements have been growing apace and reaching out to a wider variety of writers.  [read more]

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Multimodal Mondays: Using Twitter to Develop a Sense of Audience

posted: 10.7.13 by Andrea Lunsford

Twitter has become a powerful tool for journalists, writers, and artists to reach wide audiences in order to raise awareness of their work and gain readership. Writers as diverse as Joyce Carol Oates, Margaret Atwood, and Chuck Palahniuk are all heavy Twitter users.  But even writers who are not famous will benefit from carefully composing tweets to reach their intended audience. [read more]

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Teaching with Twitter Chats

posted: 12.4.12 by Traci Gardner

Talking pointLast week, I wrote about connecting with colleagues using Twitter Chats. This week I want to talk about how to use Twitter Chats with students. Next week, I’ll share some assignment ideas, so be sure to check back.

Twitter Chats are real time, or synchronous, discussions that take place using Twitter and specific hashtags. Everyone can participate in the discussion at the same time. There’s no waiting for your turn. You can use a Twitter client or the Tweet Chat site to manage the discussion during a Twitter Chat, keeping all the updates that include the same hashtag in a single column or screen.

Why Use Twitter Chats

As a classroom tool, Twitter Chats can give you a simple way to carry out a real-time discussion that relies completely on writing. Rather than students explaining ideas out loud, a Twitter Chat requires clear and concise written messages. These synchronous discussions are similar to sessions that might take place using IRC, MOO, or even Second Life.

The distributed nature of the discussion, with everyone commenting as ideas come, leads to more student-centered conversations. The teacher may frame the class discussion, but once everyone begins adding to the conversation, it becomes a much less hierarchical exchange of ideas. [read more]

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Connecting with Twitter Chats

posted: 11.27.12 by Traci Gardner

Blue Jay • Adult & Juvenile  (Cyanocitta cristata)What if a group of people all Tweeted with the same hashtag and talked about the same topic at the same time? That, essentially, is what happens during a Twitter Chat, a public meeting (or conversation, if you like) that takes place online using Twitter.

Twitter already gives you ways to share and discuss information with students and colleagues. The day-to-day connections you make with one another using Twitter are normally serendipitous. You connect with whomever seems to be around and about whatever topic or experiences come to mind. This capability is great when you need to send out a last-minute message or to connect with someone who wants to ask a quick question or has made an interesting observation. Happenstance doesn’t work for everything, however.

Twitter Chats take place at announced times and use an announced hashtag. Some Twitter Chats announce a topic for the discussion in advance. Others take shape when the Twitter Chat organizer kicks off the discussion with a question or prompt of some kind. Still other Twitter Chats are free-form, with the topics of conversation evolving as the Twitter Chat takes place. You can see the range of topics that are explored on Inside Higher Ed’s Twitter Directory for Higher Education, which includes descriptions for most of the Twitter Chats that will interest college teachers. [read more]

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