Posts Tagged ‘draft’

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Overdetermined Titles

posted: 1.26.07 by Barclay Barrios

Have students take every title in their draft and put it in quotation marks, then italicize and underline it. In peer groups, have students determine which one of these methods should be used and why.

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Categories: Integrating sources, Peer Review, Punctuation & Mechanics, Working with Sources
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Attending to Voice

posted: 1.16.07 by Barclay Barrios

Have students bring in a copy of their drafts with all quotation marks and citations removed. In small groups, have them exchange these drafts, with each peer reading a paper with the goal of restoring the quotation marks.

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Categories: Citing Sources, Peer Review, Revising
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Indexing Drafts

posted: 1.16.07 by Barclay Barrios

Ask students to look through the index in the handbook. Word processors usually incorporate a tool for creating an index of a document. Have students use the help files of the software to learn how to use this tool. Then have them produce an index of their drafts: What terms do they use the most? And what terms, ideas, or names do they feel are important enough to list in an index?

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Categories: Document Design, Drafting, Revising, Teaching with Technology
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Grammar Hunt

posted: 12.4.06 by Barclay Barrios

Bring in sentences from drafts that have errors or are syntactically strained. Put the class into groups and have each group work on first identifying the error, then finding the section of the handbook that addresses it, then correcting it. The group with the most correct answers (and corrections) gets a prize (chocolate is a good motivator).

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Categories: Collaboration, Grammar & Style, Learning Styles, Punctuation & Mechanics
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Adding the Visual

posted: 11.20.06 by Barclay Barrios

Have students review the section of the handbook on using visuals and/or visual argument. As they revise their current draft, ask them to incorporate a visual element: a picture, clip art, a table, a graph, or a chart. How does this element change the argument of the paper in its articulation or effectiveness?

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Categories: Argument, Assignment Idea, Document Design, Drafting, Revising, Rhetorical Situation, Teaching with Technology, Visual Argument
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Headings for Organization

posted: 11.20.06 by Barclay Barrios

Have students review the section of the handbook on headings in documents or on document design, as well as the section on outlines. Then have them add headings to their current or next draft, thinking of these headings as an integrated outline of the paper. In peer revision groups, ask peers to assess the accuracy, value, and wording of these headings.

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Categories: Assignment Idea, Document Design, Drafting, Peer Review, Revising
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Cut and Tape

posted: 11.20.06 by Barclay Barrios

Ask students to take a copy of their current draft, cut it up into individual paragraphs, place the paragraph slips in an envelope, and bring it into class. Bring a roll of tape to class and then, in groups, have students trade envelopes. Each peer reviewer needs to read all the individual paragraphs, determine what their order should be, and tape them back together. When students get their taped-together papers back, ask if the drafts came back in the right order. Use this as an opportunity to discuss organization and transitions, turning to the section on transitions in the handbook to help students review tools they can use to make sure the order of their paragraphs is always perfectly clear.

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Categories: Assignment Idea, Drafting, Grammar & Style, Learning Styles, Peer Review
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The Never-Ending Sentence

posted: 11.6.06 by Barclay Barrios

Ask students to use their word processor to first convert all text to lowercase and then to replace all periods with a space. Have them review the section on fused sentences in the handbook. In class, have them work in groups on one of the “period-less” drafts to restore the proper punctuation.

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Categories: Collaboration, Grammar & Style, Punctuation & Mechanics, Teaching with Technology
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Topology of Topic Sentences

posted: 11.6.06 by Barclay Barrios

Have students review the section of the handbook on topic sentences before class. Ask them to bring in a copy of their current draft with all of the topic sentences removed. In peer revision groups, share these drafts and have the peers craft topic sentences that would work in the paragraphs. The student should then compare these to her or his original sentences. This exercise has a number of advantages: students get practice identifying the topic sentences of their own paragraphs (or learn to recognize when their paragraphs do not have them), they get practice writing these sentences for peers, and finally they get a sense of whether or not their paragraphs are clearly focused, based on whether or not the topic sentences they get back accurately reflect what they feel is the content of the paragraphs.

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Categories: Drafting, Grammar & Style, Peer Review, Revising
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Babel Grammar

posted: 9.25.06 by Barclay Barrios

Have students take a sentence from their drafts and translate it into another language using an online tool such as Babel Fish or Google’s Language Tools. Students might even choose to translate it several times (from English to French to German to Chinese); in the end, translate it back into English. The resulting sentence will be a mess. Have students use the handbook to determine where the mess happened and why (e.g., “The verb shifted in tense and number”).

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Categories: Assignment Idea, Grammar & Style, Teaching with Technology
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